Star Wars

I’ve been asked this a lot, about if our Star Wars stories we did at Dark Horse “count” or are canon and so on.  This interview at CA seems to answer that:

CA: Between the original Marvel run, books like Splinter of the Mind’s Eye, and the most recent “adjectiveless” Star Wars book at Dark Horse, this time period between A New Hope and Empire Strikes Back has been heavily excavated. Lucasfilm’s canon cops have pretty much wiped the slate clean when it comes to these previous looks at the time period, but how much does this (now non-canon) stuff feed into the types of stories you’ll be telling? Do you lean on it, do you avoid it entirely?

Jordan D White: We’re no strangers to parallel continuities, here at Marvel, given our core universe, the Ultimate Universe, the Cinematic Universe. That said, as you pointed out, we’re joining with Lucasfilm at an exciting time. Unlike the previous “extended universe”, the promise going forward is that any Star Wars stories we put out are part of the core canon, right along with the films and television series. To that end, we’ve been working closely with the Lucasfilm Story Group to make sure everything we do is in lock-step with their larger plans.

So while there’s still no comment on the current Star Wars book we’re doing specifically, it seems like its stories are destined for the canon dustbin. I’m also pretty sure that come the end of December, our books will no longer be able to be distributed and sold, and will be out of print. So get them while you can.  The third and fourth (final) volumes come out in October. This applies to the other SW books Dark Horse is publishing now.

How do I feel?  Well, I don’t own Star Wars, so there’s a certain amount of shrugging involved, because what can be done?  Nothing.  This happens. What I am mystified about is more to do with the fact these three Marvel Star Wars books, by all available appearances, are supposed to do the same thing as our one original trilogy book, and that seems like a terribly uncreative thing to do to three top notch creative teams.  Maybe in execution it’ll be different.  But I understand the impluse on a business level… the still-green Luke, Leia struggling with her loss, Vader and the Empire post-Yavin, its all very logical to follow these story threads, its what people respond to, as is evident by the nearly 100k copies we sold of Star Wars #1.  Now there will be a Marvel version of that.

I wish everyone the best, and will always value my time on Star Wars, and working with so many amazing people.

Last day before Crossfit 718 moves to its new space. 18 months I spent here, making loads of friends, getting in superb shape, and leaving untold gallons of sweat in those mats (yuck)

From the extras section of the new The New York Four, a little drawing Ryan did to comment on the fact that, after at least a year, we finally decided on a name.  I love how the Treo dates it so well.

New Book: REBELS

Only one person guessed my teasers correctly, and its this: Northlanders-style series set in and around the American Revolution. It’s called REBELS.

(click to see that image big)

There’s a long article up on Nerdist with quotes from myself and the team, but the basics:  new monthly from Dark Horse starting in the late winter/early spring, Andrea Mutti drawing, Jordie Bellaire coloring, Tula Lotay on covers.

Nerdist: http://www.nerdist.com/2014/07/sdcc-exclusive-brian-wood-sets-revolutionary-war-era-series-rebels-for-dark-horse-comics/

Getting back to the sort of comics that  make me happiest.

The Thing Is, I Stutter: Megan Washington TEDxSydney 2014

This is basically what I sound like when I don’t go covert.

brianwood:

Another teaser.  There’s a very obvious clue here that only a few will get, and if you are one of them, please keep it to yourself for now!  edited:  actually, the first person to email the right clue to: northernboy at gmail wins a care package.

Re-posting.

      On Vikings, Or The Lack Thereof

brianwood:

I always figured I would revisit Northlanders in a new form, do another series on Vikings, make use of the unused stories. I had made it something of a priority, actually, and have been telling people about it.

Now, I don’t know. Maybe that’s lazy of me. Also, perhaps dangerous to try and capture…

Re-posting this.  Something will be revealed soon.

Its All From The One Big Box Of Ideas

Sometime late last summer I was asked to pitch for that Magneto solo book, a pitch that was accepted but then I declined for financial and scheduling reasons.  It was sort of a bummer, as I thought I had a decent idea.  It was a Magneto story written like a Jack Reacher novel, but with a complex, emotional side narrative dealing with his adult daughter Polaris.  It was that side narrative I was most interested in writing*.  Sometimes I regret turning it down.

(*Justin Giampaoli’s said that he views The Plague Widow as me adjusting to fatherhood, and I’ve written infants and children a few times since, reflecting my own experiences and emotions related to raising two little ones. The father/adult daughter relationship is something about which I have things to say.)

A short time ago a longtime collaborator of mine emailed to say he was up to starting something new, and did I have any ideas kicking around.  I have lots, so I sent them all over and what came back was something from 2009, called STARVE, that had, pretty much, the exact same father/daughter story I has pitched for Magneto.  But better, obviously, as this is creator-owned and therefore not tied to system that requires X amount of people-punching per 20 pages.  

I wrote half an issue of STARVE yesterday.  STARVE has a funny history, now that I recall, as it was original devised as my DMZ follow-up, before being rejected by DC, then rejected by Oni, then by Dark Horse, all for various reasons.  My agent looks at it then looks at me like I’m crazy.  But fuck it, we’re pressing ahead.  More on this soon.

Gettin’ Hammered

So I participated in a twitter discussion that this article on the Beat is about.  I never know when some random exchange is going to be Storifyed and presented as something official, but this one was, and so everyone’s comments.

Heidi at The Beat did her usual thing and summed up my comments in a sloppy way, which in this case was: “Wood felt it was part of a fratty, juvenile culture”.  Which is sort of true but a deliberate simplification of my comments.  I do agree the sort of drinking being discussed is juvenile, but there’s a reason for that.

The specific sort of convention drinking that I find personally problematic is the reckless kind, the sort that interferes with the drinkers being able to actually function at the convention.  When a buncha dudes smuggle a suitcase of cheap beer through the hotel bar and out back so they can keep the party going until dawn, and show up at the show a few hours later behind dark glasses, still drunk and reeking?  Sure, I’ll call that juvenile.  And unprofessional and dangerous and disrespectful to fans. Who wouldn’t agree with that.

I’m not a killjoy and don’t object to Barcon in general.  But I object to that sort of excess.  Its so pervasive, its so alienating to a lot of fans, and its behavior that I feel belongs to one’s teenage years more than their 40’s and 50’s.  

As Heidi summed up:  ”Being the sloppy drunk guy at Barcon can also stop a career dead in its track.”  Which is not true because some of the most influential people in comics are sloppy drunk guys at shows.  And they’re celebrated for it, patted on the back, and are the subject of legendary stories.  Which is not something unique to comics, but what is unique to comics is the close interaction of professional and fan, and the last thing we need as an industry is the visual of a fan having to hold a favorite creator’s hair back as she/he vomits all over the floor.

I invite everyone to read that Storify. 

I myself am an erstwhile member of a group that regularly drank to excess, and I’m better off to have separated from them.  But at the time it was suggested to me by a person in authority that I should come out and play in order to cement my status, to be one of the crew.  Which is fucked up, because one’s comic career should be about the work and the work only, not about how many hotel room afterparties you get invited to.